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Apple, Inc.

started by Katzwinkel on 11/17/09.

Apple, Inc.
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arguesreason
I support the free market. People complaining about Apple products being too expensive are analogous to people who complain about too much sex and violence on television. In that case, they can simply refrain from watching the objectionable program. In the case of Apple products being too expensive, they can refrain from buying the objectionable hardware. Apple is thriving, so there are obviously plenty of people who feel they're getting quality for their money.

by froggerus (55.06) on 11/22/09.

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arguesreason
Originally, the company stood in opposition to staid competitors like IBM more or less by default, thanks to the influence of its founders; Steve Jobs often walked around the office barefoot even after Apple was a Fortune 500 company. By the time of the "1984" TV ad, this trait had become a key way the company attempts differentiated itself from its competitors.

As the company has grown and been led by a series of chief executives, each with his own idea of what Apple should be, some of its original character has arguably been lost, but Apple still has a reputation for fostering individuality and excellence that reliably draws talented people into its employ, especially after Jobs' return.


by Katzwinkel (69.39) on 11/21/09.

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Incredibly durable devices. Will last for years without showing as much wear as competitors hardware.

by juszczak (68.66) on 11/17/09.

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Calacanis' Five Point Argument Against Apple

1. Apple is destroying MP3 player innovation through anti-competitive practices. I'm not convinced this is true, but the iPod is rapidly becoming a monoculture in the MP3 space, and monocultures aren't healthy. If there were a stronger competitor to Apple here, consumers would likely reap the benefits of the competition.

2. Monopolistic practices in telecommunications. I agree with him that tying the iPhone to a single carrier is a retrograde move, and not very smart perhaps (AT&T is few people's favorite company), but it's not monopolistic. Still, I look forward to the day that we have some choice here, too.

3. Draconian App Store policies that are, frankly, insulting. No argument here. Understanding the App Store approval and rejection process requires a Kremlinology degree and the decisions seem to go against Apple's ethos. This is one of the major procedural issues facing the company these days.

4. Being a horrible hypocrite by banning other browsers on the iPhone. Agreed here, too. Though there is some elegance gained by locking its platforms down, Apple should be promoting - and users should be demanding - freedom to use what apps we want as a higher value than elegance.

5. Blocking the Google Voice Application on the iPhone. Another agree. It's not right for a platform maker to block its competitors and offer only its applications.


by Katzwinkel (69.39) on 11/21/09.

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argumentsdebate
High cost of entry - fancy way of saying "expensive".

by juszczak (68.66) on 11/17/09.

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"I bought an iMac for my son (for school) along with the extended Applecare warranty. A month ago, it quit working. My son took it to the authorized Mac service center. The "tech" informed him it would be ready in 48-72 hours. Five days go by and he's heard nothing, so I called. They informed me that his computer can't be worked on because it's contaminated.

"When I asked for an explanation, she said he's a smoker and it's contaminated with cigarette smoke which they consider a bio-hazard! I checked my Applecare warranty and it says nothing about not honoring warranties if the owner is a smoker. The Applecare representative said they defer to the technician and my son's computer cannot be fixed at any Apple Service Center due to being listed a bio-hazard.

"This computer cost approx. $3,000, with the extended warranty. I'm all for destroying cigarettes and putting big tobacco out of business (yes, I'm a reformed smoker), but to label a computer a biohazard because one is a smoker is going a bit too far in regulating who can have the warranty they purchased honored. Shouldn't there be some disclaimer stating that they won't honor warranties from smokers?"


by Katzwinkel (69.39) on 11/22/09.

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You can not open up an apple product without voiding your warranty. You will have to upgrade your entire machine every time instead of extending the life of the machine with incremental improvements.

by Uklamok (62.03) on 11/17/09.

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Apple, Inc. corporation, iPhone, iMac, computer, hardware
 
         
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